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Brenda, ARIZONA
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Most Recent Brenda Camping Reviews
We'll be back, Kofa!!!

Free dispersed camping, about 23 miles south of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and stunning views of surrounding mountains. Camped here for 3 days and loved it! Many RVers were using solar panels instead of generators, adding to the serenity here. In addition to RV access, there are a couple of beautiful tenting areas near the entrance to Palm Canyon. No water or toilets nearby, so plan ahead!

Awesome hiking and mountain biking in the area. Be sure to visit Palm Canyon and Kofa Queen Canyon -- very different from each other, but both are spectacular. Kofa Queen is accessible via OHV and mountain bike as well as on foot. Palm Canyon is a fun, scrambling hike and much more difficult than Kofa Queen, but absolutely worth it.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town (via Hwy 95) for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Terrific Winter Boondocking!

Great location. Only about 6 miles from Quartzsite, AZ where they have most supplies you need. Cell service in area but slow depending on how many campers are sharing the tower with you. We just got back from our 4th January trip there in a row.

www.hitched4fun.com 🤓 Delivering fun while hitched! 🏕

Free & Just North of Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 4 miles north of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. No trash service, but this area is very close to the Refuse Transfer Station off Hwy 95. Area is quiet with no major road noise.

Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area.

Many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs though, so generator use is minimal.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

First to Review
Convenient to town

A big sandy parking lot of RV’s with both full hook-ups electric/water/sewer and dry camping options.

There are a couple of flush toilets (often no toilet paper though), $5 (passable) showers for anyone to use, and a large dumpster available near the main entrance.

The upside is that you can easily walk/bike to the Big Tent RV Show and just about anywhere in Quartzsite, the downside is that you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10. The managers are kind people but bring your patient hat!

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access to town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Close to Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 3 miles north of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. No trash service here, but area is very close to the Refuse Transfer Station off Hwy 95.

Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area.

Unlike some of the other BLM land nearby where many RVers were using solar panels, nearly everyone here at Plomosa was using a generator.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about everything a camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Near Downtown

Free dispersed camping, about 2 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. Many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs though, so generator use is minimal.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and beautiful! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Near Quartzsite

Free dispersed camping, about 20 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. We stayed here for just one night, as we were approaching Quartzsite at dusk and didn’t want to mess with finding a spot in the midst of the crowds after dark. It was a nice, easy stop for the night and put us within 30 minutes of town.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

BLM at its best!

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 2.5 miles out of town. You cannot hear Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains.

Services available on-site include a few extremely well-maintained pit toilets and trash dumpsters. By paying the fee, you also have access to both potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a few miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

We stayed for a 5 days and found this area very quiet and peaceful. Just a few RVers were running gas generators, while most had solar panels, which always makes things more pleasant. Some folks have their area established for the season hence the funny signs around the property.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking, mountain biking, and OHV trails. There are some Native American petroglyphs and grinding holes south of this area, along the main wash (accessible via mountain bike or OHV). Ask the BLM office for details as they are tricky to find, but worth it.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Basic BLM camping

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 1 mile outside of town, though you cannot hear either Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains. Trash dumpsters are the only service available on site, but by paying the fee, you also have access to very clean pit toilets, both potable/non-potable water, and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a couple miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Amazing BLM Camping with it ALL!

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and just 4 miles outside of town. You cannot hear either Interstate 10 or Hwy 95 if you choose a site close to the mountains. Services available on-site include a few pit toilets, trash dumpsters, potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region. Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Walking Distance to Town

Dispersed camping for a nominal fee ($40 for 14 days; $180 for 7 months from Sept 15-April 15; free during the summer months) and within walking/biking distance of town, though you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10 on the northern most end of this area.

Services available on-site include a few pit toilets and trash dumpsters. By paying the fee, you also have access to both potable/non-potable water and a sewage dump at La Posa South, just a few miles down Hwy 95. You are allowed to stay in one place during the duration of your stay, or move around the region.

Be sure to register at the BLM office at the entrance to this area.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Next to the Big Tent RV Show

A big dusty parking lot of RV’s with both full hook-ups electric/water/sewer and dry camping options. There are a couple of clean flush toilets and a large dumpster available near the main entrance. The managers are sweet and helpful people and have been in the area for years!

The upside is that you can easily walk/bike to the Big Tent RV Show and just about anywhere in downtown Quartzsite, the downside is that you can hear the incessant hum of Interstate 10 and during January show time, it is crowded. We stayed here during the duration of the Big Tent RV Show in 2019 (10 days), while working the Renogy solar booth and easily walked back and forth every day.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access to town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Gorgeous Views

Free dispersed camping, just 5 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. This BLM area seemed to have less traffic and you could not hear the incessant hum of traffic on Interstate 10. You could hear a bit from Hwy 95, but it’s much less frequent and annoying.

Gorgeous views of the surrounding mountains and very easy access to hiking and OHV trails. Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Free & Close to Town

Free dispersed camping, just 3.5 miles outside of Quartzsite, with no services available, but lots of space and beautiful views of surrounding mountains. Be sure to register with the Camp Host on duty near the entrance to the area. The major drawback is that you can hear the traffic on Interstate 10. Combine that with the folks running generators and the noise might drive you further out of town. To be fair, many RVers use solar panels for all or at least part of their power needs.

Scaddan Wash is the site of the annual RubberTramp Rendezvous, held during early January. The famed RTR is a gathering of like-minded mobile dwellers living in everything from new Class A motorhomes to small home-made truck campers. Everyone is welcome and workshops are free! It’s pretty awesome and the numbers of people coming to this event have doubled nearly each year.

Sunrises and sunsets are endless and jaw dropping! Easy access back into town for food, gas, firewood, laundry, and just about anything an RVer or camper could need.

Check out this article for more info about the Quartzsite region: https://thedyrt.com/magazine/local/rv-campers-guide-quartzsite-az/

Primitive, and dispersed.

Be sure to stop at any of the kiosks and get a public use regulation brochure and map. Groups using the refuge will need a free Special Use Permit (SUP). Call for more information (928) 783-7861. Camping is limited to 14 days in any calendar year, no long term. If you want a fire bring wood, it is scares. Wilderness and leave no trace practices are required. Pack-it-in, pack-it-out.

The refuge is more restrictive than the surrounding BLM lands.

Primitive and dispersed.

This site is not operated by BLM. It is within the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge (USFWS). Call them at (928) 783-7861. It is dispersed so first come first serve. Road from Hwy 95 is rough and not recommended for small cars. 14 day stay within the calendar year. No long term and no facilities. Oct. thur March is best time. The area is the only location to collect anything on Kofa. No tools allowed, hands only. 10 specimens or ten pounds which ever comes first is the collection limit per calendar year. Get a brochure at the kiosk when you enter the Kofa, it has the public use regulations and a map.

Only keep your limit and pictures and memories. Wilderness values and leave no trace practices are best way to be.

First to Review
Very friendly!

Checked in to this quiet well kept KOA for very reasonable price with barely anyone in the park for one overnighter. There was a game room, store and DVD rental library. Very surprised to see pool/jacuzzi were clean & warm for nice soak (nice after a long haul in November) Talked to quite a few Alaskans that were passing through morning after at the clubhouse coffee social which was very pleasant while waiting for laundry! Daughter said shower was nice and hot. Not much more you could ask for.

The "lake" that never sleeps?

Lake Havasu is party city as far as lakes are concerned. Plenty of drinking and skin showing. It is large, however, so you can get away from it a little if you find a quiet cove. I've never seen this lake quiet but it's still an escape from the heat and also a good place for water activities as a group and not to mention, it's beautiful. Or, if you're social, boat up to a sandbar. The water always seems to be warm. You can camp right on the shoreline. Part of our group was on the shoreline by the little lighthouse while we stayed in the trailers.

a really nice place

it has full hookups hot showers a lot if grassy areas to hang out

Amazingly gorgeous with primitive camping.

Bring everything you need because you can’t depend on others camping nearby.

Endless possibiliities

There are endless camping possibilities in Kofa. Primitive, dispersed real wilderness camping. No water. No toilets, no hookups, generators… and you have to have a 4x4 to get there! Just my kind of spot. I've explored all over this area by jeep, and by foot and never get bored going off on some new abandoned mine trail. There are hidden caves all around and great hikes to get there!

I'll just share my two favorite hidden gems in the area: Signal Peak is a must, and if you do, I recommend camping around Skull Rock. For a scenic offroad trail + neat cabin stay head to Kofa Mine Cabin!

For Signal Peak and the Skull Rock stay, you can park regular cars along Palm Canyon Road where the Kofa Natl Wildlife Refuge Brochures and info are and hop into a 4x4 for the rest of the drive. You'll need it. Don't attempt get to skull rock in any regular, vehicle, or anything without high clearance.

**NOTE: I have left a car in this lot with no issues while camping up in the canyon over night, but of course, do so at your own risk.

From that parking lot you head up to Kofa Queen Canyon and pick your spots for camping. There are plenty of good spots for tent on ledges, or on cots down near skull rock. Here you can grill and have general campfire fun.

The road to Skull Rock is undeveloped, needs high clearance and is a tight squeeze for wider vehicles. It will not accommodate campers or trailers. Tent camping only (aside from maybe your serious bug out vehicle!)

Skull rock camp spot is about a one hour and 45 minute drive from Yuma. From HWY 95 turn (east) onto Palm Canyon Road (not too far past the Border Patrol Checkpoint. Drive east 3.2 miles to Kofa Queen Canyon (KQC) Road on the left (north now). Follow KQC Road northeast about 7.5 miles into the Canyon to where a subsidiary Canyon opens up to your right (south). Passenger cars won't manage this last road. You'll need high clearance and preferably 4wd. The road inside the canyon is alternately rocky and sandy, and braids in and out with the wash. Just follow the 'better-looking' route if unsure at a junction. Enough people come up here you should be able to see lots of tire tracks.

*NOTE: There is no cell service at the campsite.

From here we drive down the trail bit further to get to Signal Peak (roughly 4,800ft), it's Kofa's highest peak. This is a strenuous hike with steep slopes and some scrambling, and should only be done by experienced hikers in good physical conditions with proper hiking boots. The beautiful view from from the top is absolutely worth the hike.

Dogs: Although I know of people who have brought dogs up here, it is a very rocky hike and could be very hot or treacherous for your pup. You may consider bringing a dog only if he is an avid hiker and has very strong paw pads (or hiking boots), and can physically handle the demands of this hike. Also, dogs as per Kofa National Wildlife Refuge Rules - are required to be on a leash at all times.

For the Kofa Mine Section, head on your way out to the Kofa Mine Museum and then just past it take the turn to Big Eye Mine - 15 mile offroad trail where a real, high clearance truck/jeep 4x4 is needed. There are at least 2 hairy sections that I even got a jeep stuck in for a minute. All of this area is full of mines and great open camping spaces.

Kofa was established in 1939 to be managed: “…as a representative area of lower Sonoran Desert habitat with a maximum diversity and abundance of native plants and animals and to protect and preserve the desert bighorn sheep and its habitat…” Since 1955, over 560 desert bighorn sheep have been trapped on Kofa and transplanted to other areas in Arizona, as well as to the states of New Mexico, California, Colorado, Texas and Nevada, to re-establish herds extirpated from habitat loss, development and over-hunting.

Unless you are a skilled Arizona adventurer, I'd advise against hiking or even offloading (in case something goes wrong) during the hot summer months when temperatures can rise to over 115 degrees F.

GREAT!

This was on the Colorado River so it was pretty great. We were here in July and it was HOT! I mean HOT! There are no shaded spots either so our RV was running the AC non stop. They BBQ food you can buy by the plate. There are 2 pool and a tiki bar to buy snaks and alcohol. The pools and bar are shaded. There is a store also. I would definitely stay here again. Loved it!

Beautiful Oasis on the Colorado River

Clean and well maintained campground in the desert. It does get hot so full hookups in the summer is a must. The pool was a nice break from the river. We brought our kayaks but the water was flowing way to fast and boats were driving by at high speed so we never got to use them. The office staff is friendly. If you borrow a cable box, be sure to return it the day before, when the office is open, if you plan on leaving early in the morning. If you don't, you will have to wait until the office is open. The showers and bathrooms were very clean. Lots of activities for the kids. Very dog friendly. Our pup was exhausted. There is a large slide and the kids seem to really have a good time.

Would definitely get riverside on my next visit.

First to Review
Only BLM Overnight Campground on Parker Strip. Earp, CA

Crossroads Campground is located on the riverfront of the beautiful Lower Colorado River. This campground is popular with winter visitors looking to enjoy the warm winter temperatures and relax on the riverfront. This campground has great access to fishing, boating and off-roading.

Natural Features:

The campground is situated on the shoreline of the Lower Colorado River. The river runs through a backdrop of steep rocky terrain, and wind shaped sand dunes. The area is teeming with wildlife, especially fish, migratory birds and small mammals.

Recreation:

The Lower Colorado River offers excellent boating, fishing, canoeing and swimming opportunities. The campground provides river front views and a beach.

Just follow the Parker Dam Road Scenic Backcountry Byway to various recreation sites along the river. The Rock House Visitor Center and Boat Launch are within a mile of the campground, and offers information and a free boat launch open year-round.

Other popular activities in the Parker Strip Recreation Area include hiking, biking, rock hounding and off-road vehicle travel.

Facilities:

This small campground contains individual campsites and one accessible campsite. All of the sites are dry camping (no water) and provide a picnic table and grill.

One vault toilet is available. There is a Campground Host available to answer questions.

Nearby Attractions:

The Copper Basin Dunes and Crossroads Off- Highway Vehicle Open Areas offer miles of off-road adventures. Rock hounders enjoy hiking and driving through the area to search for unique rocks.

Rock House Visitor Center has a free boat launch and a visitor center stocked with brochures and information about the area.

First to Review
Dispersed

On the refuge. Can collect crystals off the hill.

Havasupai campgrounds

Clean water spring available. Steps away from the falls. Beautiful campground with nice facilities for bathrooms.

Gem show

I come here every year for the gem show!

Decent winter camping

This is our go-to spot in the winter. 2 hours from Phoenix. This is all ugly desert landscape, but the lake is nice and the night sky is AMAZING! We pay $22 per night for water and electric. Spots are pretty close to each other. They have a ranger store that sells pretty much everything. The bathrooms are always clean with flush toilets and showers. The weather is close to perfect in the winter, gets pretty cold at night. I wouldn’t recommend going in the summer as the temps reach well over 100. We have fished there, but have never caught anything. The fishermen on boats bring in a ton of fish, so if you have a boat then you’ll have better luck. It’s always very windy at night, so remember to put your awnings up! We made that mistake our first time there. I’m sure we’ll go back next winter since it’s close to Phoenix and reasonably priced. We get pretty good cell service too. There are a ton of spots and are reservable online. They also have small cabins you can rent.

Primitive, dispersed with few to no facilities

A little introduction may be in order. My name is Randy Mahannah, aka Randoo, I am 67 years old, accompanied by my dog and I’ve been on the road since February 23, 2018, as of this writing just over 3 months. I have been in 5 states, 4 Motel 6’s and 10 different campgrounds over 6300 miles and stops at friends and family. I am on the road and I’m enjoying it. Let’s start with a bucket list item.

There is a place in the far western and southern desert of Arizona called the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge. At first glance, one might question the possibility of wildlife even remotely living in such a harsh desert environment but live there these creatures do, most amazingly, desert bighorn sheep. But it isn’t just the critters, it’s the desert, some of the most rugged, badass, beautiful desert in America, the border of the Sonora and the Mojave deserts and amazing country.

Oh yeah, campground rating, uuhhh, no campground unless you consider the entire refuge as your campground because that’s what it is, primitive camping at its best. At Kofa there are no facilities, no restrooms, no designated campsites, no water, no nuttin’, just a bare spot in the dirt and a place to dig your privy. So in terms of a best-of-five something rating probably zip. In terms of desert lonesome awesomeness, 5 +.

Take lots of water, you’ll need it, at least two five gallon containers and if you are so foolhardy as to visit Kofa between May and September, take a fiver for each day you will be there, just in case. I was there in March and was quite comfortable, day and night. Winters will be mild daytime, chilly to cold at night, summers, oppressively hot daytime and dance-naked-under –the-moon beautiful at night with more stars than you have ever seen unless you’ve been to Machu Pichu under a new moon.

As for things to do, desert hiking both flatland and in the mountains is what is offered. Take a camera and try to get a sheep shot. If that doesn’t work the native palms in Palm Canyon that stand still and won’t run away from you and the landscapes under a changing desert sun are wonderful.

I spent three nights there and was enchanted by a desert landscape I’ve wanted to visit since I was draft eligible. It’s all about timing and tolerance but if you find yourself in the neighborhood of Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, 23 miles south of Quartzite, 60+ miles north of Yuma, Arizona, allow yourself a night or two. Might pleasantly surprise you.

Great campground. Very clean. Friendly employees.

Good fishing. There is a boat ramp and swimming area. Hiking trail available. General store.